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These are answers that voiceguy2000 has provided in Books & Literature

Question/Answer
cucciolone asked on 09/01/05 - REQUEST OF EXPLANATIONS OF WORDS AND PHRASES TAKEN FROM THE BOOK "BORN TO FLY",by Michael Fr

Can you please explain the following words and phrases, taken from the book "BORN TO FLY,by Michael French to me:

What does "PODS" mean?
What does "THEY DARTED IN AND OUT AT US" mean? Why it is used "IN AND OUT"? I would be grateful to you if you would explain the words and phrases above in details. Excuse me,but i'm Italian and i'm striving to interpret English language in the proper way.

I have taken the words and phrases above in the text below:

"I WAS MISSION COMMANDER ON OUR EP-3E ARIES II, A RELATIVELY SLOW-MOVING AIRCRAFT THAT BRISTLED WITH PODS AND SENSORS AND WAS POWERED BY FOUR TURBOPROP ENGINES. ABOUT SIX HOURS AFTER TAKEOFF,WHEN WE WERE READY FOR THE LAST LEG OF OUR MISSION BEFORE RETURNING TO KADENA,MY CREW AND I WERE SUDDENLY INTERCEPTED BY A PAIR OF CHINESE FIGHTER PILOTS. IN THEIR SLEEK,FAST GRAY JETS,THEY DARTED IN AND OUT AT US WITHOUT CONCERN FOR ANYONE'S SAFETY."

Thank you
Giuliano

voiceguy2000 answered on 09/02/05:

pods -- small projections or turrets on the aircraft that may enclose an antenna or other electronic devices. The name comes from the resemblance to seed pods.

darted -- refers to the action of moving quickly, with the ability to change direction quickly. You might think of small minnows darting back and forth in the presence of a whale.

in and out -- here, the author could also have used "back and forth" or "to and fro" or "in every direction." The idea is that the EP-3E airplane was like the slow-moving whale, and the small fighter planes were zooming around like minnows with much greater speed and agility. A similar image would be flies buzzing around a person.

at us -- This refers to the action of the fighter planes being directed to the larger and slower aircraft.

Hope that makes it easier for you.

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Question/Answer
gem74 asked on 06/19/05 - Paper Topic

My assignment is to write an essay on character on the selected literary works: "Death of a Salesman", "Good Country People", and "Good Man is Hard to Find". Can any of you suggest on how I should write this?

voiceguy2000 answered on 06/20/05:

These are all rather dark and depressing stories. If I was going to pick a character to work on, it would probably be the Grandmother from "Good Man." Examine what makes her tick -- what are her values? What things does she hold to be true? What ironies are there as you line these things up? How does she relate to the world? How does she control other people? How does she get her way? What qualities in her do you find admirable? What qualities do you find amusing? What qualities annoy or offend you? What qualities scare you? What do you think her childhood was like?

How does the title of the story relate to her?

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Question/Answer
cucciolone asked on 05/10/05 - REQUEST OF EXPLANATION OF WORDS AND PHRASES TAKEN FROM THE BOOK "ON MY HONOR",by Marion Dane

Can you please explain the following words and phrases, taken from the book "ON MY HONOR",by Marion Dane Bauer to me:

What does "SHOT OPEN" mean?
What does "TUGGING ON HIS HAIR" mean?
What does "HIS FISTS COCKED ON HIS HIPS" mean?
What does "SHE WAS CROSS WITH EATHER OF THEM" maan?
What does "BOY-YOU'RE-GOING-TO-GET-IT VOICE" mean?

I have taken the words and phrases above in the text below:

"JOEL!" HIS DOOR SHOT OPEN WITH A REPORT LIKE A FIRECRACKER AND,AS IF CONNECTED TO THE DOOR BY A SPRING,HE LEAPED OFF THE BED.
NOW! HIS FATHER WOULD HIT HIM NOW!
JOEL'S FATHER QUIT TUGGING ON HIS HAIR AND DROPPED HIS HAND. "OF COURSE IT'S YOUR HOUSE,"HE SAID QUIETLY,"BUT YOU DON'T HAVE THE PERMISSION TO LOCK YOURSELF IN HERE WHEN MRS. ZABRINSKY IS SUPPOSED TO BE LOOKING AFTER YOU".
BOBBY APPEARED IN THE DOORWAY,HIS FISTS COCKED ON HIS HIPS IN IMITATION OF THEIR MOTHER'S FAVORITE STANCE WHEN SHE WAS CROSS WITH EITHER OF THEM.
"YOU GUYS AREN'T SUPPOSED TO BE IN THE HOUSE WHEN MOMMY AND DADDY ARE GONE",HE SAID IN HIS BEST BOY-YOU'RE-GOING-TO-GET-IT VOICE."

Thank you
GIULIANO

voiceguy2000 answered on 05/10/05:

shot open -- opened very quickly. The verb is "shot," which refers (among other things) to the action of a bullet being fired from a gun. We could also say that the door "flew open."

tugging on his hair -- To tug on something is to pull it. Here, then, the father is pulling on Joel's hair. To tug on something is not as sharp or violent as to yank on something; it connotes a sustained, steady pulling. You may have seen references to "tug of war," which is a game in which two teams pull in opposite directions on a heavy rope, each trying to drag the other across a line in the center.

his fists cocked on his hips -- Here, "cocked" means that the fists are placed in a specific position on the hips, denoting power and intensity. This author seems to like to use words associated with firearms, such as "shot" and "cocked" (which refers to the action of pulling back the firing pin of a gun, making it ready to fire).

when she was cross with either of them -- "cross" means (depending on the specific context) angry, upset, annoyed, or irritated. The whole sentence conveys that Bobby was standing in a pose with his hands on his hips just like their mother did when she was angry or upset with one of them.

best boy-you're-going-to-get-it voice -- This takes more than one layer of explanation.

First, when one sibling sees another one do something that the other will get in trouble for, a common statement is: "Boy, you're going to get it!" Meaning: You're going to get in trouble; a parent is going to punish you. (The word "boy" is just an exclamation, similar to "oh my." A variant is "boy oh boy.")

Because of sibling rivalry, often one sibling relishes seeing another one get in trouble. Thus, the voice of the sibling saying "Boy, you're going to get it" will probably have a strong component of smug satisfaction.

Finally, you need to understand that there is a writing device in which a common phrase is turned into an adjective by connecting all the words of the phrase with hyphens. That is what is being done here. We could take a phrase such as "Don't call us, we'll call you" and turn it into a description as follows:

The secretary looked at him with an indifferent don't-call-us-we'll-call-you expression.
In your story, the boy is continuing to play the part of the mother (hands on hips) when he uses his best scolding ("boy, you're going to get it!") voice to announce that the others are not supposed to be in the house.

I hope these explanations are sufficiently clear.

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Question/Answer
gem74 asked on 05/06/05 - The Story of an Hour

I'm comparing and contrasting 2 other literary works and I'm looking for symbolism in this story.

voiceguy2000 answered on 05/07/05:

I was not familiar with this story, but it is in the public domain and readily available from internet sources, so I was able to read it just now.

I have to say that symbolism does not seem to me to play a huge role in this story. It is fraught with irony, and with emotional and social themes.

The sister Josephine and friend Richards, who try to protect Louise from the shock of emotional news, can be seen as a symbol of social forces that want to keep us from acknolwedging and experiencing emotion "for our own good."

The scenery and details outside the bedroom window can be seen as symbolizing that the force of life and renewal in the face of death -- showing us that life goes on even as death is a very real part of it.

But I must say that the biggest effect of this story is irony -- Louise's reaction to her husband's reported death is joy (albeit a guilty form of joy), because of the prospect of freedom and autonomy. Louise's reaction to the appearance of her husband alive and well is almost certainly not joy (the reference at the end to "the joy that kills" is what conventional society says about it -- assuming that she is so overcome with joy that her husband is alive that it killed her -- but the reader knows better, and realizes that it is the shock of having this lovely future abruptly taken away that kills her).

It is ironic that Jospehine, standing outside the bedroom door, fears that Louise will "make herself ill" in the bedroom. We know, of course, that exactly the opposite is happening -- she is experiencing a joyful release. (And by the way, this experience does not seem to threaten her heart condition.)

Good luck.

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Question/Answer
cucciolone asked on 04/19/05 - REQUEST OF EXPLANATION OF WORDS AND PHRASES TAKEN FROM THE BOOK "ON MY HONOR",by Marion Dane

Can you please explain the following words and phrases, taken from the book "ON MY HONOR",by Marion Dane Bauer to me:

What does "SHEETING OFF HIS HAIR" mean?

I have taken the words and phrases above in the text below:


"JOEL STOOD ON THE BANK AND CALLED HELPFUL DIRECTIONS,BUT FINALLY,DESPITE JOEL'S ENCOURAGING SUGGESTIONS TO TRY "JUST A BIT FARTHER DOWN",THE BOY BEGAN WADING TOWARD SHORE. HIS HEAD WAS LOWERED SO THE WATER SHEETING OFF HIS HAIR WOULDN'T DRIP INTO HIS EYES."

Thank you
GIULIANO

voiceguy2000 answered on 04/19/05:

This is the author's colorful adaptation of a common expression used to refer to heavy rainfall. When it is raining hard, we say that "the rain is coming down in sheets." In your book, the idea is that the person's hair is so wet that the water is coming off in great amounts, and so he positions his head so that the water will fall straight to the ground instead of running into his eyes.

This use of the word "sheeting" is a poetic or literary one, and does not represent an everyday expression.

By the way, other expressions for heavy rain include:

"It's raining cats and dogs."

"It's coming down in buckets."

"It's pouring."

Hope that is helpful.

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Question/Answer
cucciolone asked on 03/30/05 - REQUEST OF EXPLANATION OF WORDS AND PHRASES TAKEN FROM THE BOOK "ON MY HONOR",by Marion Dane

Can you please explain the following words and phrases, taken from the book "ON MY HONOR",by Marion Dane Bauer to me:

What does "WIDE ACROSS" mean?

I have taken the words and phrases above in the text below:

"THERE WAS NOTHING THERE,NO FAINT DIFFERENCE IN THE APPEARANCE OF THE WATER, NOTHING TO GIVE A HINT OF DANGER. HOW WIDE ACROSS WAS THE HOLE? WHERE DID TONY GO UNDER?"

Thank you
Happy Easter!
GIULIANO

voiceguy2000 answered on 03/30/05:

"Wide" and "across" are somewhat redundant in this sentence. The speaker is simply asking, "How wide was the hole?" A simpler way of asking the question would be, "How big was the hole?"

"Wide across" would not be considered good English. It is the kind of speech that a less educated person would use.

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Question/Answer
cucciolone asked on 02/27/05 - REQUEST OF EXPLANATION OF WORDS AND PHRASES TAKEN FROM THE BOOK "ON MY HONOR",by Marion Dane

Can you please explain the following words and phrases, taken from the book "ON MY HONOR",by Marion Dane Bauer to me:

What does "HE'D PROBABLY NEVER HAD LESSONS AT THE Y LIKE MOST OF THE KIDS" mean? What is the Y?

I have taken the words and phrases above in the text below:

"HE WAS ALWAYS EVERYBODY'S FRIEND. SO MUCH SO THAT SOMETIMES JOEL COULDN'T HELP BUT FEEL A LITTLE BIT JEALOUS, WANTING TO KEEP TONY TO HIMSELF.
MAYBE TONY KNEW THIS FORM WAS BAD,AND HE WAS EMBARASSED. HE'D PROBABLY NEVER HAD LESSONS AT THE Y LIKE MOST OF THE KIDS,AND THE LAST THING IN THE WORLD HE WAS EVER WILLING TO DO WAS ADMIT THAT THERE WAS SOMETHING HE DIDN'T KNOW."

Thank you
GIULIANO

voiceguy2000 answered on 02/27/05:

"The Y" refers to the YMCA, or Young Men's Christian Association. A detailed history can be found here.

For purposes of your story, think of the Y as a community center where lessons might be given in, say, swimming, or dancing, or tennis, or whatever activity is being discussed in the book.

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Question/Answer
cucciolone asked on 02/20/05 - REQUEST OF EXPLANATION OF WORDS AND PHRASES TAKEN FROM THE BOOK "ON MY HONOR",by Marion Dane

Can you please explain the following words and phrases, taken from
the book "ON MY HONOR",by Marion Dane Bauer to me:

What does "WHOOPING THE LENGTH OF THE BRIDGE" mean?
What does "THE LAST ONE IN'S A TWO-TOED SLOTH" mean?

I have taken the words and phrases above in the text below:

"YOU KNOW WE'RE NOT ALLOWED TO SWIM IN THE VERMILLION. NOBODY IS. IT'S DANGEROUS...SINK HOLES AND CURRENTS. WHIRLPOOLS,SOMETIMES! BESIDES BEING DIRTY."
"ALLIGATORS,TOO, I BET." TONY WAS SUDDENLY SOLEMN,THOUGH HIS EYES STILL DANCED. "THE RED IN THE WATER PROBABLY COMES FROM ALL THE BLOODY PIECES OF SWIMMERS THE 'GATORS LEAVE LYING AROUND."
"THERE'S NO ALLIGATORS IN THE VERMILLION". DO YOU THINK I'M STUPID OR SOMETHING?" JOEL COULD FEEL HIS FACE GROWING HOT,DESPITE THE FACT THAT HE KNEW TONY WAS ONLY TEASING. "AND THE COLOR JUST COMES FROM CLAY,RED CLAY."
"THAT DOES IT!" TONY SAID,CROSSING HIS ARMS AND PULLING HIS T-SHIRT OVER HIS HEAD. "IF THERE'S NO 'GATORS AND NO BLOOD,
I'M GOING SWIMMING FOR SURE". LEAVING JOEL'S SCHWINN STILL PERCHED HAPHAZARDLY AGAINST THE RAILING, HE WENT WHOOPING THE LENGHT OF THE BRIDGE AND CRASHED THROUGH THE UNDERBRUSH ALONG THE SIDE OF THE ROAD. HE WAS SWINGING HIS PALE BLUE SHIRT OVER HIS HEAD LIKE A LASSO.
"COME ON,JOEL," HE YELLED BACK. " THE LAST ONE IN'S A TWO-TOED SLOTH!"


Thank you
GIULIANO

voiceguy2000 answered on 02/20/05:

"He went whooping" -- A "whoop" is a cry or shout of excitement and exultation. Warriors might use whoops going into battle; kids use them when engaged in something that is exciting. Here, Tony is whooping (yelling excitedly) to announce to the world that he is about to go swimming in the forbidden river.

"the length of the bridge" -- This expression means, "from one end of the bridge to the other."

Thus, the entire sentence means, "He started whooping (yelling excitedly) at one end of the bridge, and continued doing so as he crossed the bridge, all the way to the other side."

"Last one in is a [name of something undesirable]" -- This is a common expression that kids use when daring one another to jump into a body of water. The idea is that you should not hesitate, because if you are the last one in [the water], you will become something you do not want to become. In my youth, the most common version of this expression was, "Last one in is a rotten egg!"

Here, Tony is challenging Joel to hurry up and join him in the river by warning that he (Joel) will become a two-toed sloth if he doesn't hurry. Obviously there is no actual possibility that this would happen -- this is not a book about magic and incantations -- but the idea is to shame other kids into joining the first one who is stating this.

I hope these explanations are helpful. If not, let me know and I'll try again. :-)

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Question/Answer
DTHEMAN asked on 01/14/05 - Appreciating men

Hello voiceguy

I have a question for you regarding men. I have read book by John Grey and Dr. Laura where they indicate that men need women to appreciate them.

But how do women appreciate men who don't like to do anything for us not even take us out to dinner?

If I pay for my own ticket to the theatre and pay my own dinner what is there to appreciate?

The men I have known REALLY resent having to pay for anything or doing anything for me. I have learned to not even bring personal problems into relationships.

Seems like in current times, men don't even want to waste time coming to visit me at my home so I don't go ut with them.

I wonder about the people who write books. Aren't they aware that men just don't like giving anything to a relationship?

After several years of not being in a relationship for this same reason, I have been in a new relationship but I am not happy because I feel like I have to work hard to keep him. He doesn't like to spend money on me on dinner unless it is a fast food restaurant. Fast food restaurant is not agreeable to my health.

So most of the time, I cook something for him to eat but not always if I start feeling like I'm working to hard I stop doing it.

He has a class with his ex girlfriend and after class they go eat at a restaurant but I think maybe she pays for the food so that is why they go to a restaurant and not a fast food one.

For many years, I avoid men because of how stingy they are. They don't even ask me out on a date but expect sex instead.

So I'm really puzzled about these authors who write books about men.

Even when growing up, I have always seen women alone abondoned by men and men who resented paying bills and buying food for their families----in the times when women weren't allowed to work but had to stay home and take care of the family.

I grew up seeing men thinking they had a right to beat their wives because they brought the bread and butter home.(really resented spending money on their families)

Don't these authors understand that it is difficult for women to show appreciation to men if they recent spending any of their time or energy on us let alone their money? My current boyfriend sure likes hanging around his ex girlfriend apparently because she pays for his food.

I also think that is why he likes me because I fix him soemthing to eat. But as I said, things are going down hill because since I told him about my feeling, he did bring a couple of steaks and fish on a couple of occassions but do I need to keep telling him every week?

I hate having to live like this where I only give as long as the other person gives. It is just not me. I like giving all the time and really recent that I have to keep track of everything. I cannot be who I am. I would like to be in a relationshp with a man who just naturally gives so I won't have to feel like I am being taken advantage of.

I also have health problems and being in the kitchen is hard on me. I have discussed my feelings about this with him, but as I have heard from John Grey and others, men are hard headed. And I really hate repeating myself over and over again as some counselors recommend to us women.

What are your thoughts on this?

voiceguy2000 answered on 01/15/05:

I have not read the books by either Gray or Schlessinger, although I am generally familiar with their views.

A lot of people much smarter than me have spoken and written on the subject of relationships and "finding your perfect mate." I can only add a few thoughts that occur to me as I read your description.

1. A lot of life, especially social relationships, seems to me to involve self-fulfilling prophecies. Henry Ford is reputed to have said, "If you think you can or you think you can't, you're right." The point is that one's expectations largely dictate one's results. We tend to attract people into our lives that mirror our expectations. If we expect people to be creeps, that's how they turn out.

2. In your case, it certainly seems as though you are bringing a lot of baggage into any potential relationship, based on your past experiences. You view men as having the propensity to abandon women, to refuse to support them, even to beat them. Your encounters with men fill you with the emotions of mistreatment and abandonment. There is no way you can help communicating this to others in a thousand non-verbal ways. You -- understandably -- do not want to get hurt. This powerful instinct informs everything you do.

3. Possibly, also, there are self-esteem issues involved. You may feel, at a deep level, that you don't "deserve" someone who really respects and values you as a person. I am no psychologist, and I have obviously never met you, but it does seem to me that you show concern that maybe you are not good enough just being you, and may need to "buy affection" by preparing meals, etc.

4. The current man in your life sounds like a boor. If there's one thing I have become convinced of, it is that you cannot change other people -- only those people can change themselves, if they choose to. I recommend that you lose this guy, pronto. He just seems to want to sponge off of you and mistreat you. How rude is it for him to openly be going out with his so-called ex-girlfriend? That seems like the height of obnoxiousness to me. He sounds like an immature boob. You can surely do better. There is nothing you can do to "fix" him. That's certainly not what John Gray or Laura Schlessinger are trying to suggest.

5. There is just an enormous amount of help available -- from books, from local groups, from therapists, from clergy, and others -- on how to build and nurture relationships. I would encourage you to take advantage of these resources. Again, I strongly believe that the world around each of us tends to be a pretty direct reflection of who we are. If we don't like that world, we need to change "who we are" into something that will cause a more desirable reflection back from the world.

I think it will be very important for you to carefully consider what you learned, growing up, about men, marriage, and relationships. What was modeled for you? Were the relationships around you successful, or not? It is said that it is hard to give someone else something that you do not have inside of you, and I think that the reverse is true -- it's hard to receive something that you do not believe you have (or deserve).

In any event, I would not stay in a relationship with someone who is not treating you with respect and dignity. You should not have to keep score as to who is paying for what, nor how many meals you have fixed. Both partners should be contributing to the relationship. And it's not just a matter of meeting the other person halfway; in a strong relationship, the partners go well beyond halfway with one another.

I hope I have not been too blunt in my comments, but I am passing along the best wisdom I have about your situation.

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Question/Answer
DTHEMAN asked on 12/10/04 - BOOK RECOMMENDATIONS

I would like your opinions on what the definition of a friend is? I wonder what I should also expect of a friend?

Book recommendation on what a healthy relationship/friendship looks like are appreciated

Seems like all the people I meet for friends expect too much out of me but do not want to give anything back. I have to drive my vehicle and they never give me any money for gas and expect me to provide free meals to them and do not want to help to clean up or anything.

I do have a new male friend who seems to be manipulating me into spending money on him.

I am on social security and these people know I do not have much money and I would think that the way people behave would be different from my past but it is always the same....people who don't like to give anything back and expect too much in a way of financial gain from me.

Thanks for your help.

voiceguy2000 answered on 12/10/04:

The matters you raise in your question all seem to me to stem from issues of self-esteem and the setting of appropriate boundaries in your relationships.

I would recommend any of the many books by Nathaniel Branden on the subject of self-esteem, such as The Six Pillars of Self-Esteem. You will find these in the self-help or psychology sections of a lbrary or bookstore.

The sad fact is that, for the most part, we teach other people how to treat us. If we are being treated a certain way, it is because we have taught those around us to treat us that way.

It can be hard to create and enforce boundaries for behavior, so that other people don't take advantage of us, but it is a necessary step to mature and healthy living. Being an enabler for a mooch or freeloader is not satisfactory; it is important to respect yourself enough to say no to things that are draining away your spirit and money. In some cases, you may have to end relationships that are excessively one-sided. Part of self-esteem and self-respect is the realization that you have the right to do this.

Good luck.

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Question/Answer
denberg asked on 11/13/04 - VoiceGuy - who said this?

I would take one subject at a time, and study. But where should I begin? I recalled that a certain ancient philosopher had once said there are but three things in the universe--mind, force, and matter. Mind controls force, and force moves matter. It was easy to decide which of these things was the more important, so I began by studying psychology--a science which, by the way, is in its infancy--no farther advanced today than were the physical sciences a century ago.


OK VoiceGuy...you asked for it...who was that certain ancient philosopher Otis Adelbert Kline is alluding to in this clip from the article you referred me to?

Thanks for the last answer, it was superb.

Paul.

voiceguy2000 answered on 11/14/04:

I can't find it. It certainly sounds like something an ancient philosopher would say.

I will let this question post on the public board in the hopes that someone else reading it may be able to supply a better answer.

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Question/Answer
SCOOBY asked on 08/04/04 - Peatonal bridge

What is a peatonal bridge?

I found a website that mentions it.

http://uk.search.yahoo.com/language/ukie/translatedpage.php?tt=url&text=http%3a//www.oaxaca.gob.mx/noticias/260501.htm&lp=es_en

I couldn't find it in the dictionary

voiceguy2000 answered on 08/05/04:

The word peatón is Spanish for "pedestrian." A peatonal bridge is a pedestrian bridge.

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Question/Answer
stiamo_bene_insieme asked on 06/29/04 - TROCHEE

Hi
When a trochee is at the beginning of a line what does it do in terms of rhythm and meaning?

Jo

/ u u / u / u / u /
Alone, in |comp|any, still| my care |hath been

voiceguy2000 answered on 06/29/04:

In my opinion, this line is entirely iambic, and therefore I do not understand your question..

A trochee is a long (accented) syllable followed by a short (unaccented) syllable. The word "alone" is the reverse; it is an iamb.

Trochaic verse would be along these lines:

Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers.
Your quoted line is the reverse.
Alone, in comp'ny, still my care hath been

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Question/Answer
stiamo_bene_insieme asked on 06/28/04 - Puns

This quote is from Romeo and Juliet:
To answer '' not wed; I cannot love,
I am too young; I pray you, pardon me.'
But, as you will not wed, I' pardon you:
Are these puns? How can I tell? What is the meaning of these puns?

Thanks, Joey

voiceguy2000 answered on 06/28/04:

I would not describe these as puns.

In the first part, Capulet is mocking and deriding his daughter, stating that she is making the whining excuse of "I am too young to love, therefore I will not marry ... please pardon me."

It is derisive because "pardon me" is the sort of thing one asks following a minor (and often unintentional) discourtesy. Here, however, from her father's perspective Juliet is not simply being "discourteous" -- she is being utterly defiant. She (in his mocking words) is saying "pardon me" as an excuse for frustrating the one thing Capulet wants most in the world, causing Capulet's desire to seem to be no more significant than a minor whim. He takes it as an insult to him, which angers him.

He turns the words to ironic use in the following lines: If Juliet will not marry Paris, Capulet will "pardon" her, all right -- he'll "pardon" her right out of his house and out into the street, where she will have to fend for herself because he will disown her. It is not really a pun; it is simply irony and rhetoric.

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Question/Answer
stiamo_bene_insieme asked on 06/14/04 - Romeo and Juliet

Hi
I' studying Romeo and Juliet and I am having trouble understanding a passage from Act 3 scene 5 where Capulet says "' bread! it makes me mad" etc.
I hope you can clarify some of my doubts.
When Capulet says, " then to have a wretched puling fool,
A whining mammet, in her fortune' tender" he is refering to Juliet but what about her? I guess the questions should be, what is a " puling fool" and " mammet?"
Secondly, When Capulet continues to say " answer '' not wed; I cannot love, I am too young! I pray you, pardon me.'
But, an you will not wed, I' pardon you" What does he mean? He is quoting Juliet? I don' understand this line, ", an you will not wed, I' pardon you"
Thirdly, " where you will, you shall not house with me:        [190] Look to', think on', I do not use to jest." Capulet is saying that he will kick her out of his home? Why is he saying, " do not use to jest?"
And lastly, what is Juliet refering to when she says, " there no pity sitting in the clouds, That sees into the bottom of my grief?"- IS she refering to Tybalt as an excuse?

Thank you very much,
Francesca

voiceguy2000 answered on 06/20/04:

You should try to get one of the inexpensive paperback editions of this play, such as Signet Classics or Pelican, that is heavily annotated with explanations of archaic words and phrases. That will make understanding much easier.

Here, Capulet is enraged by the fact that his daughter is not willing and eager to marry the one he has chosen for her. He is not willing to listen to anyone on the subject.

JUL. Good Father, I beseech you on my knees,
Hear me with patience but to speak a word.
CAP. Hang thee, young baggage! Disobedient wretch!
I tell thee what. Get thee to church o' Thursday
Or never after look me in the face.
In other words: I don't want to hear any back talk from you. Show up at church next Thursday, or else.

Capulet also rudely tells the nurse and Lady Capulet to keep quiet.

When Lady Capulet states that he is getting excessively angry ("You are too hot"), he then rants that day or night, alone or in company, his unceasing "care [objective] has been / To have her [Juliet] matched [married]." Now that he has found who he considers an eminently suitable young gentleman for her, he is enraged to be met with puling [whining]. "" means doll. "In her fortune's tender" means "when good fortune is offered [tendered] to her." The overall arc of this speech is: Here I have provided a young gentleman with every fine quality, and instead of gratitude and obedience I am met with whining and resistance in the face of such good fortune. How ungrateful of you to spoil my plans for you.

"An you will not wed" -- Throughout Shakespeare, it usually clarifies things if you substitute "if" for "an" or "and" in sentences such as this. Thus, here Capulet is saying: If you will not wed, I'll pardon you, in the ironic sense of sending her out of the house. In other words, his use of the word "pardon" is a warning that he will punish her by throwing her out.

"I do not use to jest" means "I am not accustomed to jesting" -- in other words, I am not joking about this, you had better take it seriously.
An [if] you be mine [if you follow my commands], I'll give you to my friend [I will give you to Paris in wedding].
An [if] you be not [if you defy me], hang, beg, starve, die in the streets
For, by my soul, I'll ne'er acknowledge thee [I will disown you as daughter and throw you out of the house]
When Juliet says
Is there no pity sitting in the clouds
That sees into the bottom of my grief?
she is asking whether there is some heavenly force or spirit above who can look down into her soul to see the depth of her anguish. It is simply an exclamation of hopelessness and despair, leading into her plea to Lady Capulet to delay the marriage.

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Question/Answer
craigchamberlain asked on 06/15/04 - find a book

hi everyone,I'm trying to find a book and not having much luck at it so I was wondering if anyone can help me.
The name of the book is "Be Ye Reconciled" by Walden Straw.
Thanks,
Craig

voiceguy2000 answered on 06/16/04:

You're close. The author is P.P. Waldenstrom.

Take a look at this link -- I think it is the entire piece.

With the proper name spelling, you should have no trouble finding whatever you need.

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Question/Answer
kindj asked on 05/28/04 - Who said...

I read a quote once that went something like this:

"People sleep peacefully in their beds at night because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf."

It was attributed to George Orwell, but I can find nothing from him like that.

Can anybody help me with the exact quote, and who said/wrote it?

DK

voiceguy2000 answered on 05/28/04:

The Frequently Asked (or Answered) Questions page for the alt.books.george-orwell newsgroup has this to say:

Did George Orwell ever say: "People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf?" Or: "We sleep safely at night because rough men stand ready to visit violence on those who would harm us?"

Not exactly. But he did make comments that were along similar lines. In his essay on Rudyard Kipling (1942), Orwell wrote: "[Kipling] sees clearly that men can only be highly civilized while other men, inevitably less civilised, are there to guard and feed them." (Thanks to Keith Ammann for this). And in his 'Notes on Nationalism' (1945) he wrote: "Those who 'abjure' violence can only do so because others are committing violence on their behalf." (Thanks to Parbety). Where the rough men crept in is anyone' guess.
Given the extent of the discussion on this subject, easy to find on any Google search, I think we can safely conclude that if Orwell (Eric Blair) ever said or wrote the precise words that you have quoted, they were never published anywhere that is available to researchers or to the general public. Otherwise, surely the source would have been found by now, and this discussion would have been put to rest long ago.

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Question/Answer
cucciolone asked on 03/19/04 - REQUEST OF EXPLANATIONS OF WORDS AND PHRASES TAKEN FROM THE BOOK "CRY ME A RIVER",BY ERNEST

Please, explain me the following words and phrases,taken from the book "CRY ME A RIVER",by Ernest Hill:

What does the phrase "I'VE GONE JUST ABOUT AS FAR AS I'M GOING WITH THIS" mean?

I have taken the words and phrases above in the text below:

"YOU CAN'T PROVE THAT," THE CHIEF SAID. "NO MORE THAN YOU CAN PROVE SHE SAW THIS TRUCK THAT NIGHT. NOW,JACK,IT'S BEEN A LONG DAY,AND I'VE GONE JUST ABOUT AS FAR AS I'M GOING WITH THIS. MISS IRENE,THANK YOU FOR YOUR TIME. YOU CAN GO ON BACK INSIDE AND WAIT IF YOU WANT TO. AS SOON AS MY OFFICER GETS BACK,I'LL HAVE HIM TAKE YOU HOME."

Thank you
Giuliano

voiceguy2000 answered on 03/19/04:

The phrase is saying, "I do not intend to pursue this any further."

The chief is expressing that he has no desire and no intention to spend any more time looking into this matter.

If written out completely, the statement would be:

"I have gone as far as I am going to go with this [subject]."

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Question/Answer
Starla21 asked on 03/10/04 - Greek Classics-hist.college student

What are the easiest greek classics to understand?Excluding plays(Must give presentation!)

voiceguy2000 answered on 03/11/04:

Aristotle's Rhetoric is fairly straightforward. His Poetics is also approachable, as I recall. Both are available in numerous locations on the internet as well as at libraries.

You might also look at some of the works of Plato, such as the Phaedrus.

Can you provide a bit more information about your presentation? Is it that you are going to tell people which Greek works they should read (on the basis that they are easy to understand), or is your assignment to pick one Greek work, read it, and then report to people about that particular work?

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Question/Answer
laparka asked on 02/29/04 - Sales figures for a book?

Is there a way to look up (preferably on the internet) how many copies of a particular edition/ISBN of a book were sold, say book with ISBN: 0743200403? If not number of copies, how about dollar amounts of sales revenue?

(Aside: How about for music CDs or DVD movies?)

voiceguy2000 answered on 02/29/04:

It is up to each publisher whether to reveal this kind of information. There are often reports in the business press (i.e., Publishers Weekly magazine) of sales figures for extremely popular books, but there is no way to verify the accuracy of those reports (they are typically based on press releases from the publishers). As far as some sort of central clearinghouse (internet or otherwise) for this kind of information, I am certainly not aware of such a thing, and doubt very much if it exists.

If you have a legitimate reason for wanting to know this information, there is a chance that the publisher might share it with you. Also, you might check with a major book distributer such as Ingram to see whether they can provide with at least some ballpark information based on their sales.

Occasionally with books such as One Up On Wall Street (the example you used) the publisher will add legends such as "Over 100,000 Copies In Print!" to the covers. Of course, you have to take the publisher's word for this, but that would at least give you a clue.

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Question/Answer
pete4187 asked on 02/21/04 - Dewey decimal system

If a new book appears, who assigns it a Dewey decimal number? Is there some final authority on what the number is, or can local librarians assign numbers based on general guidelines?

voiceguy2000 answered on 02/21/04:

The Dewey Decimal System is owned and operated by an Ohio-based organization called the Online Computer Library Center (OCLC). Now, you might ask how an organization could "own" a bunch of numbers; I would ask that too. Nonetheless, the group has registered a whole series of trademarks based on this classification system.

I bring this up in light of the controversial lawsuit that OCLC instituted against the Library Hotel in New York (down the street from the New York Public Library), which used a Dewey-based theme in its room numbering. Although the lawsuit has now been settled, the whole episode did not add much to the lustre of the OCLC, nor did it do much to improve the general public sense that people will sue over darned near anything. (I was expecting that a judge would invalidate the marks; I suspect OCLC worried about this too, and was eager to settle.)

But to get to your question: It is ultimately up to each library using the Dewey Decimal System to implement it properly. This can be done by the library's own Technical Services people, by outside contractors, or various turnkey services (see this page for some examples available through OCLC itself).

Despite the apparent rigor of Dewey Decimal classification, the truth is that many books could plausibly be classified under a number of different categories. When you are looking for a particular book and have located the call number in the library's catalog, the only important thing is that the book be shelved properly under whatever number was assigned to it, so that you can locate it. However, consistent use of Dewey classification is important when a library patron wants to browse all of the books in a particular category. I have found that it is often necessary to collect a handful of different call numbers in order to do an adequate job of browsing, again because of the debatability of many classifications.

Call numbers are a form of metadata, a term used to denote information about information. One of the valuable contributions that librarians and information specialists make is continually refining and improving the sophistication and utility of metadata, especially in electronic environments, so that information can be located quickly and easily. Given the miserly budgets that most libraries must operate under, unfortunately, it is often not possible to implement these ideas nearly as fast as they are developed.

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Question/Answer
headranger asked on 02/06/04 - Wanted to Rent Books on Tape by Mail

I am a big fan of Books on Tape which I use while on
long business road trips.

Are there any websites that feature renting Books on Tape??? Something like NetFlix does for renting movies on DVD??

Appreciate any suggestions or ideas.
HeadRanger George in San Francisco

voiceguy2000 answered on 02/06/04:

Well, you've come to the right place for answers to this question, because I narrate audiobooks professionally and am a member of the Audio Publishers Association.

First, let me clarify one thing: "Books on Tape" is the trade name of a specific audiobook publisher (Books on Tape, Inc.). When you make contact with an audiobook source, it will be less confusing if you use the term "audiobook" because otherwise they may think you are only interested in something from that particular publisher.

There are actually a number of rental sources you can look to, and in addition a number of public libraries carry audiobooks that you can borrow for free. (Here in L.A., for example, the Beverly Hills Public Library has a massive collection, with works available on cassette, CD, and to a limited extent MP-3.) You might want to start by checking with the more significant library locations in your area.

Here are some private sources:

    1. Talking Book World is a combination of walk-in stores (there is one in Berkeley, for example) and web-based renting and buying. The big advantage of this source is that it carries, or can get, virtually anything that exists. The rentals are a bit on the pricey side, but you may not be able to rent some of these titles anywhere else (e.g., titles on the imprint of major New York publishers, and the large catalog from Brilliance Audio, which does not offer rentals itself).

    2. Books on Tape is the publisher I mentioned above. This company publishes a prodigious number of titles each year, and is one of the main suppliers to the library market. Their rentals are quite reasonable, and you keep the titles for 30 days (using U.S. Mail to receive and return the recordings). The quality of the B-O-T narrators has improved in recent years, but there are still some clinkers.

    3. Recorded Books is probably my favorite audio publisher, because of the terrific narrators they usually line up. Look for titles narrated by Barbara Rosenblat, George Guidall, Richard Ferrone, Davina Porter, and Richard Poe (among many). Same 30-day rental availability.

    4. Blackstone Audiobooks is another company with an excellent catalog, and again lets you hang onto the recordings for 30 days.

You might also want to visit the web site for Audiofile magazine, which is the leading publication in the audiobook industry. From the consumer perspective, the most valuable part of this magazine is its hundreds of reviews of audiobook titles in every conceivable genre. (You might even want to subscribe -- it is not very expensive.) Some of the online reviews are free, and the rest are available for a modest monthly fee.

And you might want to browse the Brilliance Audio web site, to see their amazing catalog. You cannot rent from this site, but the purchase prices are not horrible.

My one word of warning is to be careful not to be like a kid in a candy store. It takes many hours to listen to an audiobook, and it would probably be wasteful to rent too many at a time.

I could go on much further on this subject, but the above sites should give you enough to last a lifetime. And from amazon.com or any major bookseller, be sure to try the Harry Potter series narrated by Jim Dale -- he is fabulous.

Good luck.

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Question/Answer
denberg asked on 01/30/04 - Ulysses by Joyce

Does anyone know the unofficial headlines/titles of the 18 chapters of Ulysses?

voiceguy2000 answered on 01/30/04:

Perhaps you will find something helpful at this site, which I found with a Google search on the phrase joyce ulysses unofficial chapter titles.

I am pretty sure I have a copy of Ulysses on a bookshelf here somewhere. Seems to me I got it in college. I may even have been asked to read it at that time. I am afraid the book could have blank pages inside and I would never know it. :-)

Good luck.

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Question/Answer
Ruckus asked on 01/19/04 - Quick help!!

I have a book discussion group next week and I need a summary on the book .... " In America" by Susan Sontag. It meets on wenesday this week.

voiceguy2000 answered on 01/19/04:

You can get some clues here.

MSN said this:

In America, by Susan Sontag (Farrar, Straus & Giroux). Reactions to Sontag's sixth novel, about a 19th-century Polish actress who emigrates to America, range from breathless awe to barbed attacks. Some gush: "[A] brilliant and profound investigation into the fate of thought and culture in America. … It is something restless, hybrid, disturbing, original … [and it] shows what prose can achieve in our time" (Michael Silverblatt, the Los Angeles Times). Others say the "onetime high priestess of the avant-garde" has churned out "a banal, flat-footed narrative" that is "a thoroughly conventional imitation of a thoroughly conventional 19th-century novel" (Michiko Kakutani, the New York Times). Most agree that this one doesn't approach the level of her last novel, the acclaimed Volcano Lover, and all say it's nowhere near the caliber of the critical essays that established her reputation.
See this page.

I have to agree with Cap'n O that trying to wing your meeting based on a summary is a bit disingenuous. I hope you will be able to do at least some reading in the original text beforehand.

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Question/Answer
rainbow1000 asked on 01/07/04 - "Death of a Salesman"

I have not been abel to find an answer to the following Q: What did Miller originally want to name his play "Death of a Salesman" and why did he decide against it?

Thanks a lot!

voiceguy2000 answered on 01/08/04:

My understanding is that the original title was "The Inside of His Head." The set was to be the stylized interior of an enormous human head.

I do not have any specific information on why he changed the title (and the set), but it seems to me that the title he used was far more evocative and interesting. The use of the word "death," particularly when combined with something as mundane and unlikely as "salesman," creates an enormous amount of interest and curiosity. A play about the inside of someone's head sounds rather abstract and uninteresting.

Find more information here.

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Question/Answer
cucciolone asked on 01/04/04 - REQUEST OF EXPLANATIONS OF WORDS AND PHRASES TAKEN FROM THE BOOK "CRY ME A RIVER",BY ERNEST

Please, explain me the following words and phrases,taken from the book "CRY ME A RIVER",by Ernest Hill:

What does "FAST ASS" mean?

I have taken the words and phrases above in the text below:

"YET,SOMEHOW AT HER SMALL,DECREPIT-LOOKING HOUSE,HE FOUND HIMSELF WALKING ACROSS HER CLUTTERED LAWN,AND THEN HE FOUND HIMSELF STANDING BEFORE HER DOOR,KNOCKING. YES,HE KNEW OF HER. HE KNEW OF HER FROM HIS DAYS IN THE STREETS. HE KNEW OF HER FROM THE TAWDRY CLUBS AND VILE CRACK HOUSES. YES,HE KNEW OF HER.
HE KNEW OF FAST ASS SYBIL KANE."

Thank you
Giuliano

P.S. J hope you spent happy holidays!

voiceguy2000 answered on 01/04/04:

I am not sure I will be able to help you on this one. The book you are reading has a lot of coarse language that may not be as familiar to people like me who lead more sheltered lives. :-)

Here is my confusion:

Normally, if I heard "fast ass," I would think that "ass" was just an intensifier for "fast." Thus, someone with a sports car might call it a "fast ass car" because it was capable of going fast.

However, there is another (usually derogatory) meaning of "fast" when applied to women: a "fast" woman is a promiscuous woman, willing to sleep with anyone with little persuasion. Other words with similar meaning would be "easy" or "loose."

On top of that, the word "ass" can be used to refer to sex with a woman. It is an extremely coarse expression: "I got me a piece of ass" means that the speaker had sex with someone.

Thus, "fast ass" may be this author's way of saying that Sybil Kane is easy, willing to have sex promiscuously. I am not sure about that, however; without more context, I cannot tell whether "fast" has some other meaning.

Perhaps when you read with I have written here some things in the story will click into place and it will make more sense. I hope so.

VG

P.S. -- Happy holidays to you as well.

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Question/Answer
cucciolone asked on 12/22/03 - REQUEST OF EXPLANATIONS OF WORDS AND PHRASES TAKEN FROM THE BOOK "CRY ME A RIVER",BY ERNEST

Please, explain me the following words and phrases,taken from the book "CRY ME A RIVER",by Ernest Hill:

What does "YOU SO MUCH AS SNEEZE AND IT'S BACK TO THE BIG HOUSE FOR YOU" mean?

I have taken the words and phrases above in the text below:

"I DON'T LIKE EXCUSES,"SHE SAID. I DON'T LIKE 'EM AT ALL. PAROLE IS A PRIVILEGE,NOT A RIGHT. YOU ABUSE IT...
AND YOU LOSE IT. UNDERSTAND?
"YES,MA'AM."
"LET'S GET ONE THING CLEAR,"SHE SAID. I'M NOT YOUR FRIEND,AND I'M NOT YOUR COUNSELOR. MY JOB IS TO SUPERVISE YOUR REACCLIMATION INTO THE FREE WORLD. I'M HERE TO PROTECT SOCIETY,NOT YOU. DO I MAKE MYSELF CLEAR?
"YES,MA'AM"
"YOU ARE A LOSER",SHE SAID. THIS FOLDER I'M LOOKING AT TELLS ME SO. AND THAT'S JUST HOW I'M GONE DEAL WITH YOU. SO,HEAR ME GOOD. YOU SO MUCH AS SNEEZE AND IT'S BACK TO THE BIG HOUSE FOR YOU. UNDERSTAND?
"YES,MA'AM."

Thank you
Merry Christmas!
Giuliano
P.S. WHAT A WITCH THAT PAROLE OFFICER DEALING WITH TYRONE IS!

voiceguy2000 answered on 12/22/03:

She is saying, "I will not tolerate any misstep, no matter how small."

Thus, "if you even sneeze," your parole will be revoked and you will be sent back to prison.

Inserting some additional words to make the meaning clearer,

If YOU SO MUCH AS [do something even as trivial as] SNEEZE AND [then] IT'S [it will be] "BACK TO THE BIG HOUSE" FOR YOU.

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Question/Answer
stiamo_bene_insieme asked on 09/20/03 - greek lit/homer- odyssey

Hi,
I am studying the Odyssey by Homer. How and why does Athena direct the actions of men, afterall she is a female and a goddess? Why would a play be written in these times with a woman (Athena)given such power ? I thought women had no power over men.
Thanks
SBI

voiceguy2000 answered on 09/20/03:

I think it is dangerous to give in to stereotypes when looking at literature of this kind.

Athena was a goddess, and had significant standing and respect in the eyes of Zeus and the other gods. And, of course, even the least of these immortal beings would still have sway over mortal humans.

But other themes also show that Homer acknowledged women's stature as beings to be reckoned with. Look at cunning Penelope, and her trick of weaving, then unweaving, the shoud for Odysseus as a means of holding off the obnoxious suitors.

And I am not sure why you say that "women had not power over men." A queen certainly had power over her subjects. And clearly, even without formal titles, women had (and have) considerable power over men, because men were often called upon to prove themselves worthy in order to gain the women they were interested in.

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Question/Answer
laparka asked on 09/03/03 - Same ISBN number, different book?

Is it possible for different books or different editions of the same book to have the same ISBN number? How about the same edition of the same book published in different years?

voiceguy2000 answered on 09/03/03:

The ISBN is supposed to be a unique identifier for both the edition and the binding of the book. Thus the hardbound and the paperbound versions of the same book, even if word-for-word identical, should be given different ISBNs. Similarly, a revised edition should be given a new number.

However, there would be no reason to assign a new ISBN simply because of a later printing of an otherwise identical book in identical binding. Nor would the publisher assign a new number simply because the cover art had changed, perhaps by the addition of the legend "Now a Major Motion Picture."

It is ultimately up to the publisher to obtain the numbers and assign them according to the rules. The idea is that a bookseller who uses the number will know exactly what they are going to get. Assigning the same ISBN to two different books, or two different versions of the same book, would lead to chaos and confusion -- kind of like giving the same telephone number to two different people.

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Question/Answer
Ruckus asked on 09/01/03 - Looking for children book publishers...

I've not had a chance to go to the library to look yet and thought I'd take this route first before I went. I checked publishers online but none fit my storyline or they are not accepting mauscripts. I have an animal alphabet book, an older child animated lizard book (teaches a lesson about not "reading a book by its cover). Thanks for any help you could provide. Cathy

voiceguy2000 answered on 09/01/03:

As hard as it is to break into the world of publishing for adults (fiction and nonfiction), my observation is that it is often even more difficult to get started in children's publishing.

There seems to be a perception that, because they are "just" children's books, they are easy to write and should be easier to sell. Children's books are not watered-down adult books. It is not the case that you write them because you are not yet skilled enough to do adult books. They are a special breed, requiring a special touch and a lot of hard work.

Take a look at this listing of titles from Writers Digest Books on the subject of children's books. Some of these may exist in your library, and most are available through major booksellers.

I would also particularly recommend the book How to Write A Children's Book and Get It Published, by Barbara Seuling (Scribners).

Through these resources, learn how to align yourself with this market. That will greatly improve your chances of success.

Good luck.

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Question/Answer
demmie asked on 08/15/03 - job

i am a writer , i have some write ups which i want to publish anbd i have contacted a publishing outfit in us which said i should pay some money about $350 .
Initially , i learnt that a writer doesn't pay for his work to be published , i want you to help me get good publisher of good reputations in the usa and uk that would not collect anything from me before my work is published .
thanks

voiceguy2000 answered on 08/15/03:

In order to persuade someone to publish your material,

a. It must be of publishable quality; and

b. It must be something that the publisher's audience will be interested in.

The publisher is in business to make money from selling publications to the public (whether it be books, magazines, or some other form). Unless your material holds out the prospect of bringing the publisher more than it cost to publish it, the publisher will not be interested.

It rarely makes sense for an author to pay to have his or her work published, unless the author is dealing directly with a book manufacturer and is in a position to sell books directly to customers (for example, at speaking engagements). There are companies, known as "subsidy publishers" or "vanity publishers," that will take your money and purport to create a wonderful book from it (at a cost of thousands of dollars), but no one in the publishing and bookselling world pays any attention to such books and virtually every such author loses a lot of money on such ventures.

If you are an unpublished author, you will have to work hard to break into the publishing world. Your material must be outstanding and you must target publishers shrewdly.

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Question/Answer
asdfghjlk1 asked on 02/18/03 - Study Methods

What methods do you use to study?
Any advice you could give me for studying?

voiceguy2000 answered on 03/05/03:

I have been impressed by the advice given in this book: What Smart Students Know: Maximum Grades, Optimum Learning, Minimum Time, by Adam Robinson. Robinson is one of the original founders of Princeton Review, and gives good suggestions on how to take notes more efficiently and how to get far more benefit out of the time spent studying.

I first saw this book at Barnes & Noble but I would expect it to be available at any major bookstore and at Amazon.com.

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Question/Answer
cookie asked on 01/18/03 - Need Book Suggestions

HiAll:

I'm down to two books and I'm getting a little antsy. I stopped at the bookstore last night but none of my favorite authors have come out with anything new. Can I please have your following favorite authors or books in these categories?

Fiction

Mystery/Thriller

History

Science Fiction

Or, what great books have you read recently?

No romance, please!

Thanks,

Jo

voiceguy2000 answered on 01/18/03:

On the history front, I recently read "Nothing Like It In The World" by Stephen Ambrose -- a history of the transcontinental railroad. It was quite interesting.

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